Residential Town Planning

Single Dwellings

Although the most common type of residential development within Western Australia, single dwellings can take on different forms and typologies depending on where they are located, the size and shape of the block, and the applicable residential density coding. While most single dwellings feature only one or two storeys, some dwellings can feature additional floor levels depending on the nature of the site, design, and relevant planning framework.

According to the R-Codes, Single Dwellings are dwellings featured wholly within their own green title or a survey strata titled lot, but excluding titles which have areas held in common property.

The R-Codes do not require development approval for single dwellings where the proposal complies with all relevant with the ‘Deemed-to-Comply’ and is in a lot greater than 260sqm. However, development approval may be required as a result of other planning provisions.

Residential Town Planning Services
Residential Town Planning for townhouses

Grouped Dwellings

Grouped dwellings are becoming increasingly popular as increasing residential density codings enable more lots to be subdivided. Grouped dwellings can take on multiple forms, ranging from houses which appear as single detached dwellings, to town houses. Common examples of this style of development includes where there are numerous dwellings in a battle-axe configuration which share the same driveway leading to a public street, and where dwellings share communal open spaces (not to be confused with public open spaces).

Grouped dwellings are dwellings within strata lots that share common property with other lots, and are not to be confused with ‘Multiple Dwellings’.

Grouped dwellings require planning approval under the R-Codes regardless of whether or not they meet all the ‘Deemed-to-Comply’ criteria. Moreover, it is common for local authorities to require additional elements in order to issue an approval such as parking and waste management plans.

Grouped Dwellings

Grouped dwellings are becoming increasingly popular as increasing residential density codings enable more lots to be subdivided. Grouped dwellings can take on multiple forms, ranging from houses which appear as single detached dwellings, to town houses. Common examples of this style of development includes where there are numerous dwellings in a battle-axe configuration which share the same driveway leading to a public street, and where dwellings share communal open spaces (not to be confused with public open spaces).

Grouped dwellings are dwellings within strata lots that share common property with other lots, and are not to be confused with ‘Multiple Dwellings’.

Grouped dwellings require planning approval under the R-Codes regardless of whether or not they meet all the ‘Deemed-to-Comply’ criteria. Moreover, it is common for local authorities to require additional elements in order to issue an approval such as parking and waste management plans.

Residential Town Planning for townhouses

Multiple Dwellings

The R-Codes definition for Multiple Dwellings is intended to apply to apartment style housing, and can be summarised as dwellings which are either located above or below other dwellings, or dwellings above the ground floor in a mixed use development.

With increasing residential densities, demand for housing and proximity to transport and activity centres, and focus on minimising traffic congestion and urban sprawl, multiple dwellings are becoming increasingly popular.

Multiple dwellings require development approval in a similar manner to grouped dwellings, albeit may require even more information to be submitted as such dwellings tend to be associated with larger projects.

Town Planning for apartment buildings
Town Planning for granny flats

Ancillary Dwellings

Commonly referred to as ‘Granny Flats’, ancillary dwellings are dwellings which can be located within the same lot as a single dwelling, provided that the relevant planning requirements can be addressed.

These dwellings generally share facilities provided by the main dwelling. Although limited in permissible size, anyone can inhabit an ancillary dwelling, provided that the nature of habitation is consistent with the approved land use of the property.

Ancillary Dwellings

Commonly referred to as ‘Granny Flats’, ancillary dwellings are dwellings which can be located within the same lot as a single dwelling, provided that the relevant planning requirements can be addressed.

These dwellings generally share facilities provided by the main dwelling. Although limited in permissible size, anyone can inhabit an ancillary dwelling, provided that the nature of habitation is consistent with the approved land use of the property.

Town Planning for granny flats

Aged or Dependent Persons’ Dwellings and Single Bedroom Dwellings

These alternative types of housing may appeal to those wishing to maximise the development potential of their property in lieu of ageing populations, smaller households, and demand for more affordable housing options.

Although the R-Codes provisions relating to Single, Grouped, and Multiple dwellings still apply to Aged or Dependent Persons’ and Single Bedroom dwellings depending on the context, these types of dwellings are subject to alternative provisions. Such provisions allow for planning concessions such as reduced site area and outdoor living area requirements, provided that alternative requirements are met.

Town Planning for dependent living

Other Applications

For information about Alterations and Additions, Retrospective Developments, and Time Extensions, please see Other Applications.
Other Applications